How best to photograph a gravestone

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taking care of any family gravestones which have been left in your care is clearly an extremely important duty. We at AK Lander know that your relationship with the deceased does not end once a burial has taken place, and many people like to take fitting photographs of their loved ones’ memorials, in order to make sure they have another form of lasting tribute at hand. This is especially true if those in question live far away and are not able visit the graves they are responsible for looking after as often as they would like.

Perhaps the most vital thing you can remember when planning how best to capture a record of a gravestone through photographs is to demonstrate patience. Weather must be fine and light conditions appropriate in order for the perfect shot to be taken. If you do not wait for an opportune moment and instead compromise when it comes to either of these factors, your pictures will suffer accordingly. One of the most effective ways of improving the light in any memorial photo, incidentally, is to place a mirror – ideally a full-length, plastic one that is longer than the grave – close to the headstone in a way that reflects sun onto the carving.

It is also a good idea to take a number of pictures highlighting the grave from different aspects and angles. An image taking in the entire cemetery, for example, as well as ones which focus solely on your loved ones’ memorial, with another showing it centred around two or three others in the immediate vicinity, will add an important sense of context.

For more tips on memorial care and to purchase a high quality gravestone, pay a visit to AK Lander’s website or give us a call today. The priority for our experienced, expert team of professionals is to provide advice, assistance and support to our clients; going through us will guarantee that your headstone is durable, and that the service you receive is unparalleled in terms of dedication and sensitivity.

Image credit: Christopher Goodband (flickr.com)